Non Executive Board Member x3 - Regulator of Social Housing

Closed
Body: Regulator of Social Housing
Appointing Department: Department for Communities & Local Government
Sector: Regulation
Location: London
Skills required: Business / Commercial, Change Management, Legal / Judicial, Regulation
Number of Vacancies: 3
Remuneration: £11,000
Time Requirements: 2 days per month

Campaign Timeline

  • Competition Launched

    25/01/2019

  • Closed for Applications

    18/02/2019 at 12:00

  • Panel Sift

    01/03/2019

  • Final Interview Date

    1 April & 12 April 2019

  • Announcement

    TBC

 

Assessment Panel

Vacancy Description

The Secretary of State for the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG) is seeking to appoint up to three new non-executive members to the Regulator of Social Housing (RSH).

Those who serve on the Boards of public bodies play a vital role in the life of this country, whether by improving the delivery of public services or providing independent advice to Government. Many people from a wide range of backgrounds across the whole of the UK participate in public life by being members of the Boards of public bodies. They are involved in making decisions that develop, shape or deliver government policy and public services.

The successful candidates will have experience and understanding of how to operate effectively at Board level, and have knowledge of the social housing sector, regulation and finance.

The Regulator has two distinct roles set out in statute – these are in relation to (i) economic and (ii) consumer regulation.

The Regulator’s statutory economic regulation objective applies to Private Registered Providers (commonly known as Housing Associations) and is the main activity of the Regulator. The objective, in summary, is to ensure that those providers meet standards set by the Regulator in relation to matters such as their financial viability, governance and value for money.

The Regulator’s statutory consumer regulation objective extends to all registered providers, both Private Registered Providers and stock owning local authorities. The Regulator’s main activity in this area is to set standards related to consumer regulation matters, which are principally in relation to the services that registered providers make available to their tenants. While the Regulator sets consumer standards, the primary responsibility for resolving issues with these is between landlords, tenants and their representatives at a local level – with ultimate recourse to resolve individual complaints, to the Housing Ombudsman. The Regulator of Social Housing can only intervene if a consumer standard has been breached and as a result, there is serious detriment or potential serious detriment to tenants.

The Economic and Consumer regulation standards are reflected in the current regulatory framework for social housing, which came into effect on 1 April 2015 and is regularly updated. The regulatory framework sets out the requirements that providers must meet (in particular, seven outcome-focused regulatory standards) and the way in which the Regulator carries out its functions. The Regulator’s primary regulatory principle is co-regulation.  This approach recognises that boards are responsible for their organisation’s performance, compliance with regulatory standards and adherence to their own selected code of governance.  The Regulator also has a statutory duty to exercise its functions in a way that is proportionate and minimises interference.

About the role

Strategic clarity

  • Helping to ensure that the Regulator’s activities contribute to the achievement of its statutory objectives;
  • Helping to ensure that the Regulator has long-term capacity and capability and undertakes on-going horizon-scanning;
  • Ensuring strategic decisions are based on a collective understanding of policy issues;
  • Bringing an informed external perspective to challenge and support on delivery of outcomes.

Commercial sense

  • Informing and agreeing distribution of responsibilities between board, committees, and executive;
  • Ensuring sound financial management;
  • Scrutinising the allocation of financial/human resources to the achievement of the corporate plan;
  • Ensuring organisational design supports the attainment of strategic objectives;
  • Setting risk appetite and ensuring appropriate controls are in place to manage risk;
  • Evaluating the performance of the board and board members;
  • Planning for board member succession (within statutory constraints).

Talented people

  • Ensuring the Regulator’s overall capacity and capability to deliver its statutory objectives.

Results focus

  • Shaping the Regulator’s corporate plan and business plans;
  • Monitoring the Regulator’s performance against plans;
  • Agreeing and supporting the Regulator’s corporate standards, culture and values.

Management information

  • Ensuring that clear performance information is used to provide assurance of delivery of statutory objectives within agreed risk appetite, and that budgets are achieved.

Board members are appointed directly by the Secretary of State. There are currently six Board members: Simon Dow (Interim Chair), Richard Moriarty, Ceri Richards, Elizabeth Butler, Paul Smee and Richard Hughes.

The Board is responsible for:

  • Supporting the Chair in establishing the Board’s overall strategic direction in line with its statutory objectives and functions;
  • Helping to ensure that the strategic direction and operation of the Regulator secures and maintains wide confidence in the viability and stability of the social housing sector both within Government, and with the sector’s funders;
  • Operating and exercising the Board’s functions in accordance with the highest standards of conduct and probity, and established good practice in decision making; and promoting the most effective and efficient use of resources.

The Board takes decisions on matters such as:

  • Maintaining and developing the regulatory framework – to keep pace with changing sector risks and ensure an approach that can withstand emerging challenge.
  • Regulatory standards, strategy on the use of registration powers for both non-profit and profit-making organisations.
  • Strategy on enforcement and intervention.
  • Strategy on proactive economic regulation.
  • The use of financial and economic analysis, for example on the risk profile of the sector.
  • Delegation of regulatory functions.
  • Board members must act in accordance with the seven principles of public life.

Person Specification

Essential Criteria and experience for these roles

  • Detailed knowledge of the social housing sector and potential impacts of economic and policy changes
  • Detailed knowledge or understanding of statutory regulation relevant to the social housing sector
  • Director level senior management experience and governance
  • Senior level experience of public sector and interface with government
  • Senior level experience in running an organisation and overseeing change programmes
  • (One candidate) with significant senior level experience of operating in a customer facing environment (ideally in social housing)
  • (One candidate) with senior legal experience – including charity law and regulatory issues
  • (One candidate) with significant senior level experience of a regulatory environment

Desirable criteria and experience for these roles

  • Knowledge of a regulatory environment or housing
Attachments
Annex A to F
Candidate Information Pack RSH Board Member Recruitment
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