The National Data Guardian for Health and Social Care VAC-1723

Closed
Body: The National Data Guardian
Appointing Department: Department of Health
Sector: Health
Location: Remote with some travel to Leeds or London
Number of Vacancies: 1
Remuneration: £45,000 per annum
Time Requirements: Two to three days per week

Campaign Timeline

  • Competition Launched

    04/08/2020

  • Closed for Applications

    28/09/2020 at 12:00

  • Panel Sift

    23/10/2020

  • Final Interview Date

    20/11/2020

  • Announcement

    TBC

 

Assessment Panel

Vacancy Description

Ministers are seeking to appointment the National Data Guardian (NDG).

The health and care system collects and holds valuable data from citizens using its services.

The National Data Guardian (NDG) role was created in November 2014 to be an independent champion for patients and the public on matters of their confidential health and care information. The purpose of the role is to make sure that people’s information is kept securely, and that it is shared when appropriate to achieve better outcomes for patients. The NDG does so by offering advice, guidance and encouragement as well as scrutiny to the health and care system.

In December 2018 the Health and Social Care (National Data Guardian) Act 2018 was passed. The law placed the NDG role on a statutory footing and granted it the power to issue official guidance about the processing of health and adult social care data in England. Public bodies such as hospitals, general practices, care homes, planners and commissioners of services have to take note of guidance that is relevant to them, as do organisations such as private companies or charities which are delivering services for the NHS or publicly funded adult social care.

The NDG may also provide more informal advice about, and assistance in relation to, the processing of health and adult social care data in England. Before publishing any guidance, the NDG must consult such persons as the NDG considers appropriate.

The NDG must produce an annual report as soon as reasonably practicable after the end of a financial year and send it to the Secretary of State before the end of the following June.

Personal data is precious to those who give it in confidence when they seek care and this is recognised through the development of the Common Law Duty of Confidence. Its effective use in line with the appropriate privacy protection can improve diagnosis, treatment, the efficiency of the system and overall outcomes for individuals, not least in supporting technology-driven innovations. Success in realising these benefits from health and care data relies on securing and maintaining public trust in how that data is used.

Person Specification

The Department of Health and Social Care values and promotes diversity and encourages applications from all sections of the community. The boards of public bodies should reflect the population they are there to serve. Boards also benefit from fresh perspectives, and we are always keen to encourage candidates with private sector experience to consider applying for our roles.

Essential Criteria

To be considered, you must be able to demonstrate that you have the qualities, skills and experience to meet all the essential criteria for appointment.

This is a high-profile role which would ideally be filled by someone with knowledge of health and social care organisations and the system, the information governance framework within which they operate and in particular the common law duty of confidentiality, how modern information technology can impact on the privacy of individuals, and public attitudes towards the use of health and care data.

The successful candidate must demonstrate the following:

Leadership – A successful track record of credible and strategic leadership including working with other organisations to deliver results and the ability to challenge systems in health and/or social care when needed.

Technical – Understanding and experience of the practicalities of the security and use of sensitive data and the evolving technology that underpins it.

– Experience using data to improve organisations and building data sharing within organisations.

Communication – An ability to demonstrate a strong commitment to the seven principles of public life, and the importance of the well-being of citizens.

– An ability to relate to and influence members of the public and other stakeholders, including government.

Judgement – Independence and impartiality.

– Ability to identify, evaluate, and manage risk and to build mitigating strategies.

Additional Information

The National Data Guardian (NDG) advises and challenges the health and care system to help ensure that citizens’ confidential information is safeguarded securely and used properly.

The National Data Guardian (NDG) role was created in November 2014 to be an independent champion for patients and the public when it comes to matters of their confidential health and care information. The purpose of the role is to make sure that people’s information is kept safe and confidential, and that it is shared when appropriate to achieve better outcomes for patients. The NDG does so by offering advice, guidance and encouragement to the health and care system.

In December 2018 the Health and Social Care (National Data Guardian) Act 2018 was passed. The law placed the NDG role on a statutory footing and granted it the power to issue official guidance about the processing of health and adult social care data in England.

The NDG wants to build trust in the use of data across health and social care and is guided by these 3 main principles:

  • encouraging clinicians and other members of care teams to share information to enable joined-up care, better diagnosis and treatment
  • ensuring there are no surprises to the citizen about how their health and care data is being used and that they are given a choice about this
  • building a dialogue with the public about how we all wish information to be used, to include a range of voices including commercial companies providing drugs and services to the NHS, researchers discovering new connections that transform treatments, and those managing the services

Although sponsored by the Department of Health and Social Care, the NDG operates independently, representing the interests of patients and the public. The NDG also appoints an independent group of experts – the NDG Panel – to advise and support this work.

There is more information about the backgrounds and experience of NDG Panel members in NDG Panel biographies.

The UK Caldicott Guardian Council (UKCGC) is a sub-group of the National Data Guardian Panel. The chair of the council sits on the NDG Panel.

The council is the national body for Caldicott Guardians, who are responsible for protecting the confidentiality of people’s health and care information and making sure it is used properly. All NHS organisations and local authorities that provide social services must have a Caldicott Guardian.

Attachments
Extended2 - NDG Candidate Info pack
diversity-monitoring-form
15. GIS_Form
12.1 DHSC_Privacy-notice-v03
Return to Search